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The Fountain

November 26, 2006
Metro Cinemas, Seattle

Several years ago, I remember waiting with anticipation for Pi to open. Pi was Aronofsy's first feature and it wasn't a dissapointment. It quickly ranked among my favorites. Requium for a Dream didn't make me rush to the theaters and to this day, I have only watched some of it on cable. This can be blamed on my annoyance with the addiction plot line. Drug addiction doesn't interest me. I've seen plenty of films on the subject matter and haven't cared for any of them. Cest la vie.

But I did make a point to see
The Fountain. And I have no idea whether or not I could call The Fountain a good film, but I would certainly call it an interesting film.

I'm not going to bother to sum up the plot beyond saying that the film interweaves three stories, or maybe just one story in three settings, one involves a historic quest for immortality through seeking the fountain of youth, one is a modern day story of a researcher attempting to cure cancer and another, is set in some higher plane of consciousness where we witness the care of a dying tree. These stories share the theme of the striving for immortality.

What is particularly interesting about this film is that the action is entirely driven my symbolism. Very little happens in this film. Instead we are asked to interpret the meaning behind multi-layered symbolism.

I enjoyed this film, but it was challenging. I do not feel like I really understood enough to write in a coherent way about the film. I would like to see it again to further explore the depth of this project because unlike the subject of drug addiction, questions concerning the nature of like, death and the possibility of immortality is interesting. These are very philosophical questions, but it is amazing that Aronofsky was able to brining these philosophical questions to the screen in any kind of coherent movie.

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