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SIFF 2009

Today is the first day of the Seattle Independent Film Festival. In fact, the opening night gala screening of In the Loop is underway as I type this. I attend the festival every year, but I've never been to any of the festivities, like the opening night Gala event. Tickets tend to be expensive and I figure the money is better spent on getting to more individual screenings. So I'm at home instead of having cocktails with James Gandolfini. Or rather, a cocktail in the same room as some of the cast of In the Loop. Anyway, I'm still sick and need to rest to maximize my energy to see plenty of movies over the long weekend and perhaps, if I'm feeling significantly more spry than I do at the moment, I can stalk celebrities who are rumored to be in attendence.

But more likely, I'll just spend many hours in line and watch a lot of movies.

The biggest task every year is selecting films. I read the schedule, research the films, watch trailers, and look for recommendations from various sources like the Northwest Film Forum or The Stranger. But generally, I tend to gravitate towards certain genres (action, black comedy, martial arts, thrillers) and countries or industries (Denmark, Hong Kong, Japan) and again, my list of movies that I already have tickets for are not any of the films that are being mentioned as the must see movies of SIFF 2009. I'm trying not to let this bother me.

The list of screenings (so far):

Friday, May 22, 2009 Departures (Okuribito), Japan
Saturday, May 23, 2009 I Know You Know, United Kingdom
Saturday, May 23, 2009 Still Walking (Aruitemo aruitemo), Japan
Monday, May 25, 2009 We Live In Public, USA, documentary films
Moday, May 25, 2009. Terribly Happy (Frygtelig lykkelig), Denmark
Tuesday, May 26, 2009. Daytime Drinking (Not sool), South Korea
Tuesday, May 26, 2009. Fear Me Not (Den du frygter), Denmark
Thursday, May 28, 2009. The Merry Gentleman, USA
Friday, May 29, 2009. Deadgirl, USA, Midnight Adrenaline
Sunday, May 31. 2009. Kisses. Ireland
Friday, June 5, 2009 . Humpday. USA, Gala screening
Saturday, June 6, 2009. Mesrine: A Film in Two Parts (Part 1), France
Saturday, June 6, 2009. Mesrine: A Film in Two Parts (Part 2), France

So that sums up the films that I am currently have tickets to. I'm sure films will be added, since the festival runs until June 14.

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