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SIFF 2011: The Future


One problem I have with trying to write something about every film that I see at SIFF each year is that there are movies that not only am I not impressed by, but literally have no thought on them at all. The Future would be one of those. So instead of sitting around trying to figure out what Miranda July was intending, I thought I'd just ask Nate whether he had any thoughts on the Future. I think listening to his complaining about Miranda July's movie was much more enjoyable then actually watching it. Now for a few paraphrased quotes, that probably aren't even accurate since I am sitting in a bar writing this as I wait for my next SIFF screening. Because that is the sort of party girl that I am!

"You know, it could be kinda fun to be buried up to your neck and the only way I'd watch the Future again".

"I think Miranda July wrote a movie about all of the worst and most annoying qualities of both 90s slacker culture and hipster culture."

And when I asked what he thought of Miranda July's narration as Paw Paw the dying, shelter cat he replied that Paw Paw is Dylan Thomas, and quoted "Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

What it comes down to is that Miranda July has made an enjoyable, quirky and original film, Me and You and Everyone We Know, but her style doesn't translate well to darker material. I didn't find much compassion for a couple attempting to find meaning during an existential crisis caused by the potential stress of pet ownership. So they quit their jobs in an effort to find meaning and their relationship unravels after Sophie (July) cheats and Jason (Hamish Linklater) stops time to have a chat with the moon. Yup, it's that kind of movie...

Hopefully, there will be no more films narrated by dying shelter cats this year at SIFF.

The Future will have a limited release in the US in July.



The Future - Trailer HD

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